Brandon Rogers

Masters Student, Concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture

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As a student who graduated from the University of Central Arkansas with a B.S. in Biological Physics and a double minor in Interdisciplinary Studies and Creative Writing, Brandon has always taken a “left-brain/right-brain” approach to his studies. However, it wasn’t until he enrolled in a literature and medicine course that he realized how the humanities could shape his research interests in science, virtual reality, and medicine. At UNC, Brandon is part of the first cohort of the Literature, Medicine and Culture master’s program.

Additionally, Brandon is the Community Resources Manager for HHIVE and organizes volunteers, coordinates outreach events, and connects with scholars in neighboring programs at Duke University and North Carolina State University. His research includes critical making processes (how the act of making can also function as a critique of the object in itself, such as a technological piece that also critiques the society for which it is developed for) and game studies. When he is not playing games you can find him running half marathons and practicing studio art. Currently, he’s looking at master’s programs in neuroengineering and electrical engineering, as well as PhD programs in communication and Science and Technology Studies (STS). He aspires to go into either academia or industry, but ideally both.


Calvin Olsen

Masters Student, Concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture

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Calvin Olsen holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Boston University, where he received a Robert Pinsky Global Fellowship. His poetry and translations have appeared in The Missouri Review Online, Tar River Poetry, Poetry DailyColumbia, Salamander, and many other journals and anthologies. Recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize and the Best New Poets anthology, Calvin is currently co-poetry editor of The Carolina Quarterly and is completing translations of Portuguese poet João Luís Barreto Guimarães’s newest book, Mediterrâneo, and the collected works of the late Alberto de Lacerda.

 


Molly Brewer

Masters Student, Occupational Therapy

Molly Claire Brewer

Molly is a graduate student at the UNC program for Occupational Therapy, a study coordinator for the HHIVE Lab, and a member of the Literature, Medicine, and Culture Colloquium. She is interested in the intersection of healthcare and humanities and her research and involvement with the HHIVE focuses on how humanities can inform health care practices and the patient experience. For example, Molly recently took a course on technology and medicine focused around the adaptive and assistive devices used by individuals who have physical disabilities, cognitive impairment, low vision, hearing impairment, and intellectual and developmental disabilities. The course asks how accommodations can be made to allow patients to access their environment more easily.

As the study coordinator for the Falls study, Molly has facilitated the group’s journey through the IRB process and continues to support the principle investigators through recruiting. After graduate school, Molly plans to become an occupational therapist and is interested in working with older adults, specifically older adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as co-morbid Alzheimer’s and other dementia related diseases.


Kym Weed

PhD Candidate, English and Comparative Literature

Kym graduated from Lebanon Valley College with a B.S. in kwb profileBiochemistry & Molecular Biology. After a few years of working in a pharmaceutical company doing product testing in a microbiology lab, Kym decided to return to graduate school to pursue an M.A. in English at the University of Maryland where she began to recognize the value of using literature in medical ethics, cultural studies, and science studies. As a doctoral student at UNC, Kym has joined an energized community of scholars interested in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She studies American literature from the late nineteenth to early twentieth century, which was an exciting and formative period in science and medicine. Kym investigates how bacteriologists and authors in this time period understood microbes, and she considers how this new view of the world impacted human relations with one another and the world.

At UNC, Kym has been a teaching assistant for the undergraduate Literature Medicine, and Culture course and served as the co-chair of the graduate student Literature, Medicine, and Culture Colloquium. In the medical school, Kym has lead critical incident discussion sections and assisted with the pilot RICE course that is now part of the third year curriculum. In HHIVE, Kym is the Assistant Director and has been the Study Coordinator for the Fall Narrative Study and enrolled in the inaugural ENGL695 class.


Rachel Warner

PhD Student, English and Comparative Literature

Rachel WarnerRachel graduated from Wesleyan University with a double major in English and psychology and a concentration in cognitive psychology. Frustrated with the biomedical model for understanding mental illness, Rachel looked for other ways to ground her research. Reflecting on her own background as a close reader of literary narratives, she soon realized that she could use a similar approach in literature to narratives of mental illness.

Rachel is currently a PhD student in English and a research assistant for the HHIVE Lab. She co-designs the HHIVE website with her fellow research assistant, Trisha Remetir, and is also in charge of communicating information about health humanities-related events within the organization and beyond. Last semester, she enjoyed taking ENGL 690, in which she designed an interdisciplinary project on qualitative approaches to understanding aging and falling. This semester she is taking a Trauma Literature course at NC Central University that aims to teach how trauma can promote growth and resilience in people. When she is not at the HHIVE, she enjoys practicing yoga and cooking up healthy vegetarian/vegan dishes. This summer, she plans to travel, practice her Spanish, and become a certified yoga instructor.


Sarah Singer

PhD Student, English and Comparative Literature

Sarah Singer

Originally from Maryland, Sarah moved to North Carolina for graduate school in 2013.  She is about to finish her PhD exams and will soon be a PhD candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC. Her experiences as a Lyme Disease patient and sexual health peer-educator when she was at the University of Maryland sparked her interest in health humanities. Both of these experiences taught her that health and medicine–language, experiences, treatments, and more– are constructed rhetorically, meaning that they are interpretive and that we can understand them in different ways through a humanistic lens.
 
In the HHIVE, Sarah works with Jordynn Jack and Jen Stockwell on the Writing Diabetes Project. Outside of the HHIVE, she is working on a dissertation project about the visual and textual rhetorics of Lyme Disease. Related research interests include the rhetoric of health and medicine; disability studies; visual ethnography and visual rhetoric; gender and sexuality; feminist historiography; and writing in the disciplines. She teaches ENGL 105 and ENGL 105i: Health and Medicine, and has been a teaching assistant for WMST 101, ENGL 611, and the UNC Warrior-Scholar Project.

Jennifer Stockwell

PhD Student, Rhetoric and Composition

Jennifer graduated from Ohio State University in 20Jennifer Stockwell10 with a B.A. in English and minors in theater and international studies, and then went to Methodist Theological School in Ohio, from which she received a masters in theological studies. While working on her masters, she studied the role of narrative in religious ethics, and felt particularly drawn to how personal stories, especially autobiography, could figure into ethical discussions. Her primary focus was on stories of marginalization; however, she became acutely aware of the theme of finitude in many personal narratives.
When she came to UNC, she knew she wanted to explore these themes from a new angle. Rather than focusing on religious narratives, she investigates how people tell stories about health and the role of religion in medicine for patients, providers, and healthcare systems. In the HHIVE, she facilitates the Writing Diabetes workshop. Together with the Writing Diabetes team, she helped develop the curriculum for the workshop and received approval for the project from the IRB. In this pilot study, they are hoping to document the connection between writing and health. She is also working with Dr. Jordynn Jack on an article about gestational diabetes narratives and trust. Outside of the HHIVE, she is working on a project about the emplaced rhetoric of hospital chapels. She is investigating how the built environment of the chapel communicates with visitors, enabling them to engage in spiritual or religious practices.

Past and Present Students in the Health and Humanities: Intensive Research Practice

Katharine Henry
Katharine Henry
PhD Student
English and Comparative Literature
Izzy Pinheiro
Izzy Pinheiro
Undergraduate Student
Interdisciplinary Studies in Health Humanities
Nakisa Sadeghi
Nakisa Sadeghi
Undergraduate student
French and Francophone Studies
Business Administration and Chemistry
Pre-Med track
Samuel Weeks
Samuel Weeks
Undergraduate Student
Natalie Yosipovich
Natalie Yosipovitch
Undergraduate Student
Interdisciplinary Studies in Health Humanities
Lorena Millo
Lorena Millo
Undergraduate Student
English Literature and Business
Administration, Chemistry minor
Version 2
Grant Glass
PhD Student
English and Comparative Literature
Manisha Mishra
Manisha Mishra
Undergraduate Student
Biology and Chemistry
Interdisciplinary Studies in Health Humanities
Audrey Ward
Audrey Ward
PhD Student
English and Comparative Literature
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Lauren Howland
Undergraduate Student
Global Studies and Philosophy
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Hannah Doksansky
Undergraduate Student
Photojournalism and Interdisciplinary Studies:
Health Communication